Live Donald Trump is US president-elect in ‘America’s Brexit’ as Hillary Clinton concedes election – live

0

113257538_president-elect-donald-trump-large_transeo_i_u9apj8ruoebjoaht0k9u7hhrjvuo-zlengruma

Donald Trump won the US presidential election early this morning in a stunning victory that sent shockwaves around the world.

The Republican took the key swing states of Florida, North Carolina and Ohio early this morning, as he marched towards the White House.

Mr Trump pledged that he would be “president for all Americans” in his New York victory speech.


He said he was “reaching out” to the people who had not supported him to “unify the country”.

“Now it’s time to bind the wounds of division. I say to Democrats and Republicans it is time come together as one united people,” he said.

“I pledge to be president for all Americans,” he said, adding: “The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer.”

He said it was not a campaign but a movement that had won him the White House, comprised of “all people of different backgrounds and beliefs”.

He said victory had been “tough”. “This political stuff is nasty and it’s tough,” he said, while thanking his family.

It was an extraordinary election night. Mr Trump won some early east coast states and did not look back. When he secured the key swing state of Florida, a clear path to the presidency was laid out. He went on to win Ohio and South Carolina.

In an extraordinary development, Mrs Clinton did not initially concede the election – but then later called Mr Trump to congratulate him on his victory.

Mr Trump offered generous words for his vanquished opponent, saying she had worked hard for many years and was owed a “deep debt of gratitude”.

The crowd was respectful at the mention of Mrs Clinton.

In a conciliatory speech Mr Trump added:  “We will get along with all other nations willing to get along with us. We will deal fairly with everyone. We will seek common ground, partnership not conflict.

“America will no longer settle for anything less than the best. We must reclaim our destiny.”

The Republican surpassed expectations and confounded pollsters in Florida, where Mrs Clinton had been expected to win following a surge in the Hispanic vote.

Mrs Clinton’s hopes of a swift victory faded as the Republican picked up a series of states early on and maintained his momentum.

Financial markets around the world plummeted as votes for Mr Trump stacked up.

Mr Trump’s threats to rip up a free trade agreement with Mexico and tax money sent home by migrants to pay for building a wall on the southern US border if elected president caused the peso to hit a record low.

Nigel Farage, the leader of Ukip, described the result as “bigger than Brexit”.

He told The Telegraph that Mr Trump’s election will represent a “massive result” for Britain.

He said that the UK would have a “friend in the White House” who will prioritise trade relations with the UK.

Change of tone from Trump?

Nick Allen reports:

Mr Trump spoke in a noticeably quiet voice. He stood in front of a bank of 20 US flags, and other state flags. To his right was a Make America Great Again hat in a glass case.

On his left his wife Melania and children stood at the side of the stage with Chris Christie, Rudy Giuliani and other members of his campaign.

The crowd who had waited through the night raised their energy for a few last cries of “Trump, Trump”. One shouted “Eight years”.

Mr Trump said he would not let them down and the work of his “movement” was only just beginning. He ended by saying “I love this country!” He left the stage to the Rolling Stones’ You Can’t Always Get What You Want.

Change of tone from Trump?

Nick Allen reports:

Mr Trump spoke in a noticeably quiet voice. He stood in front of a bank of 20 US flags, and other state flags. To his right was a Make America Great Again hat in a glass case.

On his left his wife Melania and children stood at the side of the stage with Chris Christie, Rudy Giuliani and other members of his campaign.

The crowd who had waited through the night raised their energy for a few last cries of “Trump, Trump”. One shouted “Eight years”.

Mr Trump said he would not let them down and the work of his “movement” was only just beginning. He ended by saying “I love this country!” He left the stage to the Rolling Stones’ You Can’t Always Get What You Want.

Trump conciliatory to Clinton in victory speech

He offered generous words for his vanquished opponent, saying she had worked hard for many years and was owed a “deep debt of gratitude”.

The crowd was respectful at the mention of Mrs Clinton.

In a conciliatory speech Mr Trump added:  “We will get along with all other nations willing to get along with us. We will deal fairly with everyone. We will seek common ground, partnership not conflict. “America will no longer settle for anything less than the best. We must reclaim our destiny.”

Trump pledges to be ‘President for all Americans’

Mr Trump pledged that he would be “president for all Americans” in his New York victory speech. He said he was “reaching out” to the people who had not supported him to “unify the country”.

“Now it’s time to bind the wounds of division. I say to Democrats and Republicans it is time come together as one united people,” he said.

“I pledge to be president for all Americans,” he said, adding: “The forgotten men and women of our country will be forgotten no longer.”

He said it was not a campaign but a movement that had won him the White House, comprised of “all people of different backgrounds and beliefs”.

Clinton ‘calls Trump to congratulate him’

CNN reports that Mrs Clinton has called her rival to congratulate him on his election victory.

DONALD TRUMP ELECTED PRESIDENT OF THE US

The AP has called the election for Donald Trump.

He will be the next president of the United States of America.

Trump arrives at ‘Victory Party’

Cheers erupted Mr Trump arrived at the Hilton Midtown hotel where he is staging his “Victory Party”.

CLINTON NOT READY TO CONCEDE

John Podesta, Mrs Clinton’s camapaign manager has said: “She is not done yet.”

He has told the Clinton election night party that the campaign is not ready to concede yet because too many states are “too close to call”.

He told the crowd to go home – the campaign will not be saying anything more tonight.

“I know you’ve been here a long time,” he said.

“We’re still counting votes, and every vote should count.

“Several states are still close to call, so we’re not going to have anything more to say tonight.

“Everyone should head home. You should get some sleep. We’ll have more to say tomorrow.

“We are so proud of you, and we are so proud of her. She has done amazing things and she’s not done yet.”

Boos and chants of “lock her up” rang around Mr Trump’s election night event after it was announced Mrs Clinton would not be conceding defeat.

An extraordinary development.

 

Like everyone else in the prediction game, Mr Luntz was served up a feast of his own words to consume over the next few hours. First came the odd unnerving slice of reality. Then came a few massive helpings of humble pie.

One by one, all their predictions, all their forecasts, their obsessively mined data, their experience at calling previous elections fell apart. It all counted for nothing. Trump was demolishing the pollsters, just as he demolished his rivals to be Republican nominee, just as he – at the time of writing – looked set to demolish Hillary Clinton’s chances of assuming the presidency.

‘Trump understands business, that’s why I voted for him’

Harriet Alexander has been speaking to a New Jersey-born Cuban businesswoman about why she is celebrating Mr Trump’s success:

Barbara Garcia, 37, who owns property and mortgage brokers, says her main reason for supporting Mr Trump is that he understands business. “What Obama did to us in terms of healthcare and the minimum wage was ridiculous,” she said. “He forced us to get rid of employees. “You can’t order me to pay for my workers’ healthcare without knowing how much I make. I agree with everyone having healthcare – but just not penalizing those who employ them.” Her parents came to the US from Cuba, and this also influenced her vote, she said. “My parents came here for freedom. And that’s what is most important to me. “People say I should support a woman for president – well, sure, but just not that woman. “And I know Trump has said some bad things – at times, I was like: ‘Put a sock in it.’ But I can deal with that. As long as he fixes this country.”

Donald Trump: the 22 wildest moments of his 2016 presidential election campaign

From banning all Muslims from America to building a wall along the Mexican border (who’s gonna pay for that wall?) – Donald Trump’s campaign for the US presidency has provided shocking, amusing and controversial moments aplenty.

Will a President Trump affect Muslim visitors to the US?

Dianita Sugiyo, 34, a university lecturer in Indonesia – the world’s most populous Muslim country – said she was particularly concerned by Mr Trump’s calls to temporarily ban from Muslims from countries with a history of terror ties.

“As a Muslim I feel very uncomfortable if Trump wins. He has always been anti-Muslim and I am afraid he will discriminate against Muslims,” said Sugiyo, a member of a leading Indonesian moderate Muslim organisation.

“The United States is a multicultural country and there are a lot of Muslims there, so this is very terrifying,” she said at a US embassy event in Jakarta.

 

Trump’s good behaviour in final fortnight may have been decisive

If Donald Trump wins this, it might be because for the final fortnight of the campaign he did as he was told, Rob Crilly writes.

He shut up and let all the attention focus on his rival. Hillary Clinton was not a good candidate. She may be a fine politician, but she represented all that Mr Trump wants to overturn.

She is a political insider, dogged by questions about whether she can be trusted, whether over her emails or the Clinton Foundation. But every time she was on the back foot, Mr Trump would give her a way out, deflecting attention away from her with one of his own missteps – often an easily avoidable Twitter tirade or public pronouncement.

Until the final couple of weeks that is, when he was reportedly deprived of his phone and reduced to dictating his tweets through aides who could vet their tone and content.

As a result, the last week was dominated by fresh questions about Mrs Clinton’s email server – thanks to FBI Director James Comey’s odd intervention – rather than Mr Trump’s behaviour. Was that the difference in the end?

113087852_republican-presidential-candidate-donald-trump-turns-to-the-american-flag-at-a-campaign-ra-large_transu_vbryrj_hbson2oc1dj-aghvxd6xeycydj1mrggwy4

Hispanics for Trump supporters celebrate victory in Florida

Harriet Alexander reports from a Trump victory party in Miami:

Inside the Las Vegas Cuban Cuisine, in an industrial estate on the outskirts of Miami, the glee of the Trump supporters cannot be contained.

Aged mainly in their 50s, some are tearful. They are all in Trump t-shirts and baseball caps, waving their Hispanics for Trump banners.

A microphone is being passed around for declarations, mainly in Spanish, about how this is a victory for Cubans, Venezuelans, Colombians and all Latinos. It descends into chants of “Trump, Trump, Trump! USA! USA!”

French ambassador to Washington dismayed

Gerard Araud, the French ambassador to Washington and a social media institution, tweeted his dismay at a collapsing world order.

 gerard_araud-xlarge_transbw6ldu0ej6v4v3u-dfpaghgnpjy8i6bememq2yxhkhugerard_araud-xlarge_transbw6ldu0ej6v4v3u-dfpaghgnpjy8i6bememq2yxhkhu

The Trump voters were always out there – now they are being heard

Gareth A Davies, the Telegraph’s boxing correspondent, writes:

I was lucky enough to be amongst the revellers in New York on the night in 2008 when Barack Obama was elected into the White House.

Britain’s brilliant boxer Joe Calzaghe was fighting an American legend Roy Jones Jnr at Madison Square Garden that weekend. The scenes in Greenwich Village and liberal, monied Manhattan were a joy to behold.

Like America had lifted its hood. The parties went on and on. It felt like an epiphany for this great mass of peoples.

I’m on my way from Las Vegas to New York this evening, on a three-week sojourn covering back to back to back prizefights. Las Vegas-New York-Las Vegas. I’ve been a frequent visitor to the United States in the last 25 years, covering fights, over one hundred times, a week at a time, in all places. When I can, I drive.

Each visit has been its own mini story. It’s a wondrous country, but it’s also deeply flawed, and reinvented, like its two presidential candidates. A brilliant 2-hour documentary last night here on the PBS channel profiled both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, and the beautifully edited piece outlined the journeys of their lives, the trials of Mrs Rodham Clinton’s husband vacationing from their marriage, his lies, her carrying it, hellbent on keeping them together to drive her own ambitions, and the position they had worked themselves into at the White House.

And on the other side, Trump’s flawed, ego-driven business desires, leaving a trail of destruction with the conclusion that he was really just a great promoter. I leave Las Vegas shortly and arrive at JFK, New York, early tomorrow morning. I’ve been covering the comeback of another politician last weekend – a boxing one in Manny Pacquiao, a prizefighter who rose from the barangays or shanties from extreme privation and through his popularity in a 20-year career, he has risen to become a senator in The Philippines.

He is pushing through bills on the death penalty for heinous crimes, in a country where the recently-elected President, Rodrigo Duterte, has ordered a search and destroy mission on anyone dealing methamphetamine, addiction to which is rife, particularly in Manila.

There are already claims of many extrajudicial executions. But I was told by many Filipinos this weekend who attended the fight that the fear created has made their country much safer.

It has been compelling watching this divisive electioneering in the USA. So compelling that I’ve consumed every magazine, television show and conversation that could be had. Like Brexit, it has had Americans more engaged than ever. But it has been exhausting because of the lack of love or respect for both candidates.

But what I have found different is that many, many more people – often white, often a little older, or poorer – have been happy to say Trump. On previous trips it was hard to find them. The voters were out there all the time. And they are being heard tonight.

Rudi Giuliani: ‘Win Florida and you win the election’

Rudi Giuliani said: “I knew it was turning when I saw the figures coming in from Florida.

“This election was about one state. Win Florida and you win the election.

“Maybe the Clinton chapter is over now. They’ve brought enough disgrace to America, the presidency, and the state department. They corrupted the Justice Department.”

Mr Giuliani refused to comment on whether he would try to prosecute Mrs Clinton over her emails if he becomes Attorney General.

113246122_new_york_ny_-_november_08__supporters_of_republican_presidential_nominee_donald_trump_pose-large_transt1yghx8zbx7fxqby89c64srczv_9zefctfon6xztpqi

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here